Fossil Fuel Subsidies at $2 Trillion, Despite Global Condemnation

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Jan 302014

Despite a growing consensus that support for the oil and gas industry is unfair, inefficient and globally dangerous, there’s no actual implementation of plans to change it.

By Carey L. Biron | January 30, 2014
WASHINGTON – Global tax breaks, incentives, and various other consumption and production subsidies for the fossil fuel industry are likely topping $2 trillion each year, amounting to 2.5 percent of total gross domestic product for 2012. After a dip in the immediate aftermath of the global financial recession, these figures have risen in recent years, according to a new report from Worldwatch, a Washington-based think tank. Incentives for renewable energy sources remain tiny by comparison, estimated at just $88 billion for 2011. (…)
“In the U.S., a lot of this is just lip service. The country is really not yet walking the walk,” Alexander Ochs, director of climate and energy at the Worldwatch Institute, told MintPress. “Both nationally and internationally, we have not made any significant progress toward the goal of reducing subsidies, which was actually declared quite a long while ago. In my view, it’s outrageous that we’re not making any more progress.”
[You can find the whole story here]


Apr 022013

Applications of ESMAP’s Model for Electricity Technology Assessment (META) in the Caribbean Islands and Central America  

Tuesday, April 2, 2013 | 12:30 – 2:00pm 1850 I Street, NW, Washington, DC | Room I2-220

The selection of electricity supply technology is critical for designing new power generation projects, and associated transmission and distribution facilities. These choices are increasingly complex due to the pace of technological change, rapid shifts in equipment and fuel prices, availability of comparable data, and the challenge of reducing carbon emissions.To help electricity policy-makers and planners select the most appropriate options, ESMAP has developed the Model for Electricity Technology Assessment (META).  The tool provides a comparative assessment of the levelized costs for a range of electricity supply options, including renewable energy.

Chair: Rohit Khanna | Program Manager, ESMAP, The World Bank

Alexander Ochs| Director of Climate and Energy, Worldwatch Institute
Fredric Verdol  
| Power Engineer, LCSEG, The World Bank
Michael Weber  | Research Coordinator, Worldwatch Institute

World Bank Group Staff
External participants





The model takes into account changes in capital and operating costs over time, environmental externalities, and transmission and distribution options. This session will present examples of META’s use in the Caribbean Islands and Central America by the World Watch Institute and The World Bank.

The session will particularly focus on presenting excerpts from Worldwatch’s work in Jamaica and The World Bank’s work in Haiti.

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